04.16.2018
R.E.M.
Monster

I've been listening to "What's The Frequency Kenneth" endlessly in the last few days. It's a strange choice, I know, but the song has completely hooked itself into me. The proximate blame goes to Scott Aukerman and Adam Scott's new podcast "R U Talking R.E.M. Re: Me?", where they talk about R.E.M. for an hour every week, even though they haven't even gotten to Monster yet, and really I don't find their analysis and discussion of the band all that interesting. It's just a fun goofy listen. But what it has done is made me revisit their records with fresher ears, and ultimately that's what's making me think I've grossly underestimated these guys my whole life. They're really fascinating once you lay it all out, almost by being so un fascinating. There are no major peaks and valleys to their career; there's no drama, no grand failed experiments, no major lineup changes. And yet since 1983, these dudes have released so many undeniable hit songs, entirely in their own voice, making (practically) no concessions to fashion or popularity. Every single album (at least until the 21st century, where you can forgive them for being 20 years into their career) has at least one song on it, usually 2 or 3 and sometimes 4, which would be any other band's creative pinnacle, most of which have since entered whatever we can describe as the modern rock/pop canon. It's remarkable.

Even Monster, which at the time perhaps got some criticism for selling out to some grungy, alt-rock zeitgeist, has mostly aged beautifully, and contains at least 2 all time greats. One of which, to take us back to the lede, is "What's The Frequency Kenneth", which, again, was kinda made fun of at the time for being alt rock nonsense. But listen to it! It's great! It's an undeniable jam. And even though they might've distorted the guitar a little more than previous albums, it is anything but a grunge cash in. It's pure and beautiful and perfect. And lucky for all of us, you can find dozens of copies Monster for $2 or less at every used record store and thrift shop in the country.

03.22.2011
R.E.M.
Automatic For The People

After years (decades?) of hearing "Everybody Hurts" coming out of tape players, MTV, FM radio, dramatic TV shows, gum commercials, grocery store speakers, Chris Farley movies, Applebees restaurants, and my own subconscious, I am just now sitting and listening to it, patiently and consciously, in a good pair of headphones. It's fun to do that sometimes, you know. Actually pay attention to music. And it makes an incredible difference. What I felt for years was an overblown, hyper-emotional ballad, sounds humble and quiet. The famous guitar arpeggios is nearly equaled in the left channel by an organ, which you can barely hear in any radio mix. It's really a pleasant little song. Plus, and this really gets me... this is practically an Otis Redding song! Listen to it. Imagine Otis moaning "When day is long..." Perfect, right? It could stand up right next to "These Arms Of Mine" and "Pain In My Heart." And when they hit that F# and the drums come in on the bridge? Awesome.

08.08.2018 - by Steve
OMCDuluth
Barbecue

I'm going to try to not be too critical of OMC because honestly, Duluth needs good places to eat. And not just good places to eat, but good places to eat that are away from the Canal Park / Fitgers continuum. This place is in a little business strip in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, which is cool and neighborhoody and up-and-coming and I didn't even know it existed until now. But also it's weird and gross, because this entire block is seemingly owned by the Bent Paddle Brewery, OMC included. So between OMC, and the "Detroit style" deli, and the cool ice cream place, you're basically just spending your night at a glorified brewery food truck lot. It's weird.

Oh also did I mention that OMC stands for "Oink, Moo, Cluck?" Yep.

So anyway, their barbecue is good. It all has that extra 'something' that makes it stand out from your standard barbecue, a little oddball seasoning here and there, some nutmeg maybe, who knows. And the pulled pork has that porchetta vibe that makes sense for the north country. My problem (as usual) comes because I'm a cheap jerk: It's just too expensive for what you get. The portions are decent-ish for a regular restaurant, but not for a bbq joint. That would maybe fly over in Canal Park, but this is a Locals Only street. It's not expensive real estate. You can't be charging this much for not all that much meat. Plus there's no bread! No bread! Just throw some Wonderbread on the plate, OMC! Help us out here! Plus, even though I enjoyed the little extra 'something' in the meats, they kept adding somethings into the sides, until it was all too much. They need to find some very simple, baseline flavors that you can pile all the good good meat on top of!

How bizarre.

07.29.2018 - by Steve
TerzoSouth Minneapolis
Duck breast, mushroom bolognese

Other than its occasionally outstanding Porchettaria sandwich window, I've never given Terzo much thought. I knew it was owned by the Broders people, and of course I love Broders Cucina and very much like Broders Pasta Bar, but something about Terzo always made me think "this isn't for me." Well so, we just tried to go to Broders Pasta Bar, and it was too long of a wait, and Broders Cucina sounded a little too basic for our fancy dinner needs. So we went to Terzo. And listen: It was one of the better "good" meals I've had in a while. This place is le-g-g-git, and should be included in any conversation about the best restaurants in this town, which I don't think it's been heretofore.

07.28.2018 - by Steve
Hamburguesa El GordoSouth Minneapolis
Tacos, hot dog

Hamberguesa El Gordo is a dream. It's exactly what this city needs more of.