08.08.2017
Mary Halvorson Octet
Away With You

I'd heard of Mary Halvorson before in recent years, but I mostly randomly happened upon this new Away With You album. It's a fascinating listen. Halvorson is a jazz/improvisational guitarist, and the octet is made up mostly of what you'd imagine a traditional jazz octet to contain. But the music feels like something truly its own. It's jazz in that it contains improvisation, is mostly instrumental, and moves itself along themes and modal movements, but save for its occasional forays into noisey free-jazz nonsense, the goup plays more like an experimental post-rock band attempting to translate marches and waltzes through the freewheeling horns of a New Orleans parade band. Except I just read that sentence and it's not like that at all. I don't even know. The high points on here are near miraculous; everything comes together behind some beautiful descending chord progression and weirdo guitar melody, and it feels completely fresh and new. And fun! But then all too often, the tracks fall apart into noodly free-jazz bullshit and aimless drum solos. It's not going to find a place in my life the way that more melodically-composed recent albums by Mammal Hands or Courageous Endeavors, but still, this is something worth hearing, refreshingly outside any sort of modern jazz orthodoxy.

07.28.2017
Cornelius
Mellow Waves

The first half of Mellow Waves is Album Of The Year good. It takes everything you loved about Cornelius and melts it down into perfectly composed prog-pop that could only have been created by this one guy. It's a dang joy. The second half, as you probably guessed, sort of comes down from that high. It's not bad at all, but you want it to kick into some newer crazier gear, but instead it just chills out and slowly fades off. Which is fine. But I just feel like this could have been an all time great album. Instead it's merely very, mind-blowingly, frustratingly amazing.

07.22.2017
Sly and the Family Stone
There's a Riot Goin On

Holy shit this is a good record. I'm a little mad that I've never bothered with it before. It's basically the fundamental blueprint of all the best neo-soul and Dilla/Shadow/Kanye hip hop beats that came a couple decades later. It should be played at all parties. Mandatory.

07.17.2017
MIKE
May God Bless Your Hustle

MIKE is a teenager from Queens who I assume is named Mike, and he raps. I can't really pinpoint anything particular about his voice style, he doesn't have any particularly memorable lines to quote back to you, and nothing about his beats or hooks are hummable. But from the standpoint of artistry and honesty, May God Bless Your Hustle feels great. The beats, produced apparently mostly by MIKE and some character named Sixpress, land somewhere in the Madlib/Shadow sphere of rough, analog, introspective hip hop, without worrying too much about old school boom bap or modern day trap bullshit. The whole album just flows, with MIKE's vocals often pushed so high in the mix that his verses sound like late night audio confessionals rather than attempts at stardom. And even if his style isn't exactly flashy or unique, it works through pure honesty and thoughtfulness. Basically, this is a dude I want to root for over the next few years, hoping that he doesn't get caught up in the seemingly bottomless hip hop hype machine that turns every young Bandcamp and SoundCloud rapper into an overexposed sellout.

07.16.2017
Girlpool
Powerplant

Girlpool's first album was a surprise favorite of mine in 2105. It had this rough, tossed off vibe, sounding like two girls who decided to record an album together at the same time that they're just learning to play guitar, yet totally unafraid to just go for it, arranging their perfectly written songs to fit within the constraints of their limited chops, belting every melody in catchy 2-part harmonies, and not giving a damn that they don't know any drummers.

This new one, then, disappointed me at first. It sounds like a band. A band that knows what they're doing. With a quality set of distortion pedals and a drummer who probably teaches lessons on weekends. "And this is a bad thing?" Well, considering the charm of the first Girlpool album, yeah. The rough edges are generally gone, and their vocals have gone from joyous bellows to more generic breathy indie whispers. And yet. And yet it grew on me very quick. The songs and melodies are still fantastic, and their trademark 2-part harmonies are still everywhere. And the drummer kicks ass and it basically rocks. It was a quick turnaround from "Ugh, Girlpool just ruined their sound" to "Top ten of the year" in my book.


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07.16.2017
Sufjan Stevens
Planetarium

I'm filing this under "Sufjan Stevens," because it feels like his album, but in reality, Planetarium is a collaboration between Sufjan, Nico Muhly, and Bryce Dessner. That sounds like a perfect combination of collaborators, and an album where each song is about some different celestial object or idea sounds like a perfectly batshit dumb idea for Sufjan to absolutely pull off. And when you hit play, it works. It sounds like a beautiful surprise Sufjan album that basically came out of nowhere, and it's terribly exciting. But then it just keeps going, and nothing much happens. It doesn't build to anything great, no single song stands out from the others. It's just, sort of present. Like a lesserAge of Adz. Which sounds harsh, but I don't know if there's anything on here to even be harsh about. It just doesn't land.

07.16.2017
Cigarettes After Sex
Cigarettes After Sex

Cigarettes After Sex sound like some beautiful combination of Rhye and Mazzy Star. And if that sounds good to you, I agree. Album-wise, there's not a whole lot different happening from track to track, but whatever, because [re-insert first sentence here].

06.03.2017
Elder
Reflections of a Floating World

I haven't finished listening to this new (fucking killer) Elder record yet, so I can't really form any real thoughts about it (except that it's fucking killer). I just love the album cover so much that I want it on the top of the page. So here it is. Pretty sweet, right?

06.03.2017
Nightlands
I Can Feel The Night Around Me

Remember a few posts down when I accidentally bought the Cameron Avery album thinking it was a different album by a different bass player of a different popular indie band? Well I knew you were wondering, and here it is! The actual album I meant to buy! Nightlands' I Can Feel The Night Around Me! It's pretty good. Lots of (dare I say?) Beach Boys-y harmonies, chill moody washes, just barely funky. It's good enough.

06.03.2017
The Catherine Wheel
Ferment

Back in late high school I decided I should like the Catherine Wheel. I didn't. Then I tried again in college, still no. Once more around the early-oughts, no dice. But recently I woke up in the middle of the night, and could just feel it. "It's time," the voice told me. "You totally like the Catherine Wheel now." So I picked up Ferment, and I do!

06.03.2017
Father John Misty
Pure Comedy

I've always had a hard time appreciating Father John Misty. Which is odd, because he seems to fit right in to the Harry Nilsson / Randy Newman / Benji Hughes singer songwriter continuum that I'm such a sucker for. But this new one finally tipped the scales for me, and I'm totally sold on this thing that he does. I don't know if I'm ever going to just take it out for fun and enjoyment to listen to all that much in the future; this is some very specific, disruptive, thesis-oriented stuff that doesn't necessarily play well at parties. But to sit and listen to Pure Comedy is like reading a good book, or watching a good movie. Glad I did it, who knows if I'll need to revisit it in the future.

04.21.2017
The New Pornographers
Whiteout Conditions

The New Pornographers put out a new album, and look, it's not too great. It's good and competent like their last 3 or 4, but just doesn't have the highs of their best stuff. But more importantly, I finally managed to see them live! And even more importantly than that, I saw them live with Neko Case on the tour! Dan Bejar wasn't on this tour, but that's okay. To be honest, they all seemed a little bit tired and sleepy, looking a lot like a band that's been doing this for 18 years. But they still played great, they played the hits, and holy crap can Neko Case seriously sing. She's unbelievable. I'd follow her into battle.

04.09.2017
Future Islands
The Far Field

I'm super impressed by Future Islands' ability to stay the course. They easily could've gone the obnoxious route after 2015's "breakthrough", hiring big-name producers (Danger Mouse?) or bringing in bigger sounds (Danger Mouse and an orchestra?) or—mercy—partnering with Young Thug or something. But what they did is make another Future Islands album. And while part of me is curious about what exactly "next level Future Islands" might've sounded like, I'm perfectly happy just taking 12 more songs of Sam Herring—possibly the best voice in all popular music right now—singing over some steely driving indie new wave.


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04.08.2017
Mastodon
Emperor of Sand

Over the last 15 years, every Mastodon album has been something. Remission was the brutal and concise debut. Leviathan was the transformation from concision to confidence. Blood Mountain was the big weird bold step into 'anything goes and we can do it all.' Crack The Skye was the mellowed out prog concept album. The Hunter was an all-out refinement down to songwriting basics. Once More Round the Sun was seemingly an appeal to mainstream popular metal. Things were going so well until those last two. So I was a little nervous for the state of Mastodon leading up to Emperor of Sand... and I'm still a little nervous. I'm really not sure what this album is, how it fits in. If anything, Emperor of Sand is every Mastodon album at once—there's some Remission/Leviathan rage, there's some Blood Mountain weirdness, there's a lot of Skye vocal trading and layering, and there's unfortunately still plenty of Hunter/Once More 3-minute tunes potentially ready for hard rock radio. I don't know what to do with it. Luckily, Mastodon happens to be really, really good. So even if I'm confused by its mission, I still enjoy the hell out of this album.


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04.07.2017
Mount Eerie
A Crow Looked at Me

A Crow Looked at Me is such a personal record that I hesitate to even call it a 'record.' I hesitate even more to attempt to write a review of it—or at least I would if I wrote reviews professionally for some critical venue or another. It's probably the best Phil Elverum record since The Glow Pt. 2, and I wouldn't be surprised if I hear people say it's his best work ever, but even that praise feels imprudent. The situation is that is the man's wife died, and he wrote these songs to try to bear it. Some of them are journalistic records of post-loss minutiae, some are memories of the days and months previous, and some are urgent pleas to the universe to make sense of it all. It's all deeply moving and deeply personal, but written beautifully and honestly, prose poetry just barely formed into songs—and it's all written specifically to her, rather than to the listener or some omniscient third party. I'm not using hyperbole when I say that it's somewhat uncomfortable to listen to, as if these are private recordings not meant to be heard by anyone else. But Elverum released it because he wants to share, so I'm okay with it (although, in honesty, I haven't even turned the record to Side B yet. It's just too painful to engage with all in one sitting). Musically it's very pretty, free of nearly all of the instrumental obfuscation that he's practiced over the last decade, generally acoustic guitar and some assorted droning keys and basses. But lyrically, I think there's no question that it's the best work of his career, although again, even raising the question or placing these words in the same canon as his previous work feels entirely beside the point. The whole collection is wonderful, really, and while I'm sure Phil might appreciate hearing that, he almost certainly doesn't care. This isn't a record of music, it's a record of a man who is trying to cope by doing the one thing he knows best how to do: making a record.

- by Steve
Jersey Mike'sNortheast Minneapolis
Italian sub

Hot take: Jersey Mike's is the best sub sandwich chain. I only recently had it for the first time, and I find myself thinking about it nearly every day. A little expensive though.

06.11.2017 - by Steve
JL BeersNortheast Minneapolis
Cheeseburger

I'd been mostly avoiding this JL Beers place that popped up in Northeast a couple years ago, because it had the desperate stink of a chain trying hard not to look like a chain in order to appease all of us city folk. Which is exactly what it is. But when I found myself in need of a very particular kind of thin, oniony, 'burger stand' style bar burger one night, I discovered that is the exact kind of burger JL Beers makes. Which is refreshing for a chain like that. Furthermore, with a little snooping I learned that JL originated in Fargo, and really only has a few locations in the North and South Dakota, and now a few in the Twin Cities. So as far as chains go, it's almost downright charming. Okay, so I'll go to JL Beers. The place is set up just like some "real" dive bar. Long, open grill and fryers behind the bar, not a ton of tables. The biggest red flag is on those grills, where they have automatically timed presses (I guess you'd call them?) that flatten and speed-cook the burgers on the grill. Which feels a little sad, but maybe fun that you could say your burger is cooked by robot? Or maybe every restaurant has these, but just never out in the open? Anyway, I got a cheeseburger, and it looked perfect, like something from Matt's or the Cedar Grill or any 'real' place that JL Beers is trying to mimic. Except: the burger tasted gross. It reminded me of the burgers I'd get as a kid from a Chinese restaurant when I was too picky to eat Chinese food. This very specific, oily, tinny essence that just tastes wrong. And the fries had a similar wrongness. So. They almost did it, JL Beers. Almost.

04.09.2017 - by Steve
PinKuNortheast Minneapolis
Fried shrimp, tuna on crispy rice, gyoza

Everything I ate at PinKu tasted great. The pork filling in the gyoza was a little mushy, and the radish 'noodles' under the crispy shrimp was a little bit plain, but otherwise it was all mostly flawless. And hey, I even like that the design of the space isn't too annoying, and that it's a modestly low-key, order-at-the-counter spot that doesn't seem to be trying too hard. Good! But my problem with PinKu is this: I spent $24 there, ate every scrap on my plate, and was still hungry enough when I left that I damn-near went into Savoy next door to get a meatball sub. It's a gripe as old as time. "Oh I paid a fortune at this fancy rest-o-raunt for just a tiny plate of food and a piece of lettuce!" It's annoying. I get that good food takes time and talent and costs money. But this was a little overboard, especially for a place that claims to offer "Japanese Street Food," which to me means it should be hearty and a little bit crass, but filling and satisfying. Granted, I've never been to Japan, but I don't think anything at this place can be qualified as "street food"—it's more or less a sushi joint. (I'd rant further about the new trend of restaurants claiming to serve "street food," but you can scroll down to my Spitz post to get your fill of that). Basically, look... I like PinKu. I enjoyed their food. I liked being in their space. But I just wish it was either $5–6 cheaper, or they would've given me two more pieces of shrimp and one more tuna crispy rice cube. And maybe some miso soup. Or a coupon for a free meatball sub next door.

04.03.2017 - by Steve
Gardens of SalonicaNortheast Minneapolis
Lambchops

Gardens of Salonica was always one of those places that just existed in my mind. I'd heard people mention it, and it seemed to be somewhat timeless and simply around, but until I lived over here, it never occurred to me that it was a place that was real and that you could actually eat at. So I did! And I'm pretty sure it was good! I only qualify that because it isn't food that necessarily yells at you to let you know it's good. I got a plate of grilled lamb chops on linguine, with some garlic spread and balsamic, as well as a cup of leek and lemon soup. It all tasted good, and (and this will sound cliche, but it's true so I've gotta say it) felt honest. Gardens of Salonica doesn't seem to be trying to impress you. They just make quality Greek food. Even the interior had some nice pieces of earthy sculpture art hanging here and there, but it just felt natural and unfussy, and the signs outside are hand-painted in a way that says "We didn't hand paint these signs because it was cool and artisanal, we just thought it was nicer to hand paint the signs." So, yeah, I'm totally on board with Gardens of Salonica. Also I just realized (this very moment) they gave me lambchops even though I ordered the lamb riblet special. Crap.

03.22.2017 - by Steve
Gino'sNortheast Minneapolis
Chicken parm

Gino's is a minor miracle. It's a small and unfussy new restaurant and bar in Northeast that specializes in chicken parm and meatballs and lasagna and basic dumb hearty red sauce, refreshingly free of irony, hype, and affectation—there's no mention of "farm to table" ingredients, there's no menu of house-distilled sambuca, there's no menu item that's "a new take" on anything—it's just some delicious damn Italian food in a relaxed bar environment at a decent price. I'm so happy this place exists.

So what I ate (if you're curious) is I got the chicken parm, with a side of spaghetti and a side of broccolini. The parm itself was damn near perfect, fried and crispy and cheesy and plentiful. The spaghetti was good, but served a little oddly; it was in a little cup over to the side of the chicken, like how you'd get a side of beans at a barbecue place. Weird, but hey, whatever. But for as good as the parm and the red sauce were, the broccolini, to my surprise, was actually the highlight of the meal. It was pan fried in some garlic butter, and then finished with a small handful of pickled red pepper, basically juiced right into the pan. It was the mostly intensely flavorful broccoli I've ever had. Super delicious.

The problem, however, is twofold, and contradictory. 1.) I was only person there. Well, after two others left at least. But the point is, Gino's is new and great, but it's not doing business. On one hand, this is great, because it's usually damn-near impossible to get a table at a new restaurant in this town without going through annoying hoops and fighting with a hundred other cool people trying to go there before all their friends. On the other, of course, is that an empty restaurant usually turns into a closed restaurant very quickly. So, hey, people, go to Gino's! 2.) It's apparently owned by the people behind The Lyndale Tap. Which makes me think it's very much setting itself up to open more locations around the suburbs eventually. Which isn't inherently bad, but admit it, it's a little annoying. So for now, I'm going to enjoy the hell out of Gino's Parm before it turns in to the next Buca di Beppo. Join me!


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02.27.2017 - by Steve
Young JoniNortheast Minneapolis
Pizza, ribs, bibim salad

I usually hate the word "pretentious" as a critique of a thing or a person or a place—it's too easy, too vague, and too often thrown out as a thoughtless deflection, a defense against having to think too hard or imagine art's possibilities. Calling things "pretentious" is how the good guys lose elections, and how Marvel movies break box office records. But still: Young Joni is fucking pretentious.

Young Joni is also fucking delicious. So you can see how I'm having a hard time working through my feelings here. But look. The front doors have hidden handles. You have to figure out how to open the doors. The hostesses in front need to basically show everybody how to get in. The bar is a secret bar. It's around the corner in a hidden door, with only a long red light to show you where it is. Why? Who knows. Inside, it's all bare wood, mid century chairs, and vintage dishware. They serve drinks in Peanuts and Looney Toons glasses. Why? Who knows. The drink menu is in an old photo album, featuring old photos. Of who? Who knows. And—excuse me for italicizing this, but it needs to be done—they play their music on a reel-to-reel. Jesus christ. And yeah, this might just be "quirky" rather than "pretentious," making use of old hi-fi technology. But according to the mustachio'd mixologist, all the music is downloaded digitally and given to a company in Chicago who takes the mixes and transfers it to reel-to-reel tape. This is literal pretension. There's nothing vintage about it. They just want to be the one restaurant in the city using a goddamn reel-to-reel player in their secret hidden bar. Good lord. We don't need this. Northeast doesn't need this. Nobody needs this. This isn't Chicago. This isn't Brooklyn. This is insanity.

But remember when I said it's fucking delicious? It is. Because (as you know, of course), Young Joni is run by the woman behind Pizzeria Lola, which I would say is not pretentious, and is maybe probably the best wood fired pizza in town. So behind all the vintage glasses and reel-to-reels and million dollar interior design buildout, Young Joni is basically Lola with an expanded, Asian-focused (rather than Italian) menu. And since you've had Lola's Korean short rib pizza, you know what you're in for. So what I had was the spare ribs—delicious, but not quite as good as the best legit barbecue ribs in town—the Korean short ribs—a happy accident that the waitress accidentally brought to the table, and were absolutely fantastic—a bibim grain salad—which was basically a cold, vegetarian bibimbap bowl and was delightful—and best of all: the Parisian pizza. I'm not sure if Lola serves the Parisian, but it's basically prosciutto, caramelized onion, pickled mustard seed, and arugula. It was honestly one of the best pizzas I've had in a long time. Right up there with Lola's Korean pizza, maybe even better. Nothing too crazy about its flavors, but just a nice, perfectly balanced concoction. So, yeah, as far as the food goes, I'm all in on Young Joni. It's completely wonderful. I just... it's like... can we not with all the bullshit?

02.27.2017 - by Steve
Bad WaitressNortheast Minneapolis
Reuben

Bad Waitress? Um, more like Bad Restaurant.

02.08.2017 - by Steve
Crescent Moon BakeryNortheast Minneapolis
Pizza

I think I've written about Crescent Moon on here before, probably years ago. So, so many years ago. But I just had to chime in about it once more here, because I can't stress it enough: Crescent Moon, the Afghan bakery on Central, makes fantastic pizza. They also make fantastic kebabs and goat curries. It's really one of the most interesting food places we have in this city.

02.05.2017 - by Steve
1029 BarNortheast Minneapolis
Lobster roll

The Smack Shack downtown is very annoying, and you should not go there. It's basically like if you dropped a harbor-side Boston tourist trap restaurant-theme-park in the middle of Minneapolis and filled it with every young Target executive trying to find a happy hour close to his new condo and every bachelorette party who was too late in getting reservations to Chino Latino. Which is unfortunate, because their lobster rolls are pretty good. Well lucky for you there's the 1029 Bar! Because—and this isn't so much a secret as it is something people just don't really know—the Smack Shack sells lobster rolls at the 1029! Not just lobster rolls, either, but basically their full menu. I don't really understand why this is the case, but I'm not going to think too hard about it. Point is, it's a decent-to-good neighborhood bar, where you can get a good-to-very-good lobster roll (which may or may not be a little too salty), and you don't feel like a douchebag for eating there.

02.02.2017 - by Steve
Cali's VietnameseNortheast Minneapolis
Pho

Cali's is an okay Vietnamese restaurant that's a block away from me. And that's pretty much it.

02.01.2017 - by Steve
SpitzNortheast Minneapolis
Gyro

Spitz is the worst restaurant in the city. I'd usually try to give a place the benefit of the doubt, or at least try to be level-headed thoughtful about how I respond to a bad restaurant experience, but I don't know. I think this is a special case.

First of all, it's called "Spitz." That's disgusting. Nobody wants to eat at a place called Spitz. Secondly, they describe themselves as "Mediterranean Street Food," which, I mean, would be cool if they were, but they basically sell gyros and fries. And then you have the interior design decisions. Which I'd describe as "Avril Lavigne chic." Just the gaudiest faux-punk rock dripping-neon-paint nonsense this side of Target's teen girl section. There's a full wall-sized photo of Kurt Cobain crowd surfing, for fuck's sake. Kurt Cobain. There's just no rhyme or reason for any of it.

But that's all secondary, right? We're here for the food, right? Well my gyro (they don't call it a gyro, they call it a "Berlin style" something or another, which, Fuck You) tasted like nothing, and was cold. The dipping sauce with the fries tasted like nothing. The fries were Aramark's special "beer battered" style I assume, and tasted like such. The whole place basically made me sad, and further makes me sad when I consider that Spitz is basically the symbol of what is happening to Northeast.

Spitz sucks.


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11.29.2016 - by Steve
Ideal DinerNortheast Minneapolis
Eggs and french toast

Oh, by the way, I went to Ideal Diner for the first time in years. I think it's under new ownership now. Who knows. It's completely unexceptional greasy spoon diner food; I love it.

11.26.2016 - by Steve
Lu's SandwichesNortheast Minneapolis
Pork banh mi

Sometimes this music and food blog is about food. But often (lately) it's about me complaining about the state of food in this city, and really about the state of this city in general, which seems to be steamrolling forward towards... something... without trying to figure out what that thing might be, instead just handing the keys over to a small handful of developers who in turn hand retail space leases over to a small handful of restaurant food and liquor retail entrepreneurs who then maybe make good food, but mostly pay restaurant interior design companies and design and marketing companies a ton of money to make their spaces look good—but more importantly, brand-expandable—in the hopes that they can have a successful year or two and then open a second and third and fourth location, and maybe god willing become the next Chipotle.

Focusing my attention on Northeast this time around, specifically the 'downtown' Northeast area, anchored by Surdyk's and Kramarczuk's and, well, formerly Nye's [this space reserved for future angry essay about the motherfuckers who destroyed Nye's, and pretty much sealed the deal on proving nothing in this town is sacred and that we'll all just be a condo eventually]. Here's a quick tour of those couple blocks:

• Rachel's - dying
• Chipotle - chain
• Noodles - chain
• Ginger Hop - lame
• Kramarczuk's - god help us the day they close
• Pizza Nea - fine
• Punch Pizza - chain trying to shut down Nea
• Jimmy Johns - chain
• Keegan's - fine
• JL Beers - local chain from Mankato
• Rachel's - dying
• Butcher Block - fine
• Masu - locations in MOA and Apple Valley
• New Bohemia - locations in Golden Valley and Roseville
• The Bulldog- locations downtown and Uptown
• Whitey's - second location in Stillwater
• Ray J's - chain
• Conga - fine
• Brasa - at least one other location
• Rusty Taco - chain
• Spitz - probably a chain, or will be soon. Either way, who on earth wants to eat at a place called Spitz??
• Savoy Inn - chain. Used to be a beloved mom n pop joint.

Which brings us to:
• Lu's Sandwiches - second location on Nicollet

I liked Lu's pork banh mi a lot. With the standard banh mi caveats applied (that french bread is always too crusty!), it was a pretty flawless and authentic sandwich. Awesome, great, good. But to bring us back around to my central issue here: This isn't just a quality Vietnamese sandwich place. It's the second, new-construction condo based, location of what maybe once was just a quality Vietnamese sandwich place, but is now clearly gunning to become the next Chipotle. Funky fresh clean interiors. Funky fresh clean graphic design. A big logo on their bright green wall. A menu and build-it-in-front-of-you service taken straight from the Chipotle playbook. And of course a price tag for a sandwich that was a solid couple bucks pricier than what you'd pay at a "real" Vietnamese sandwich place. Because the interior design firm doesn't work for fish sauce and shaved carrots.

What am I complaining about? I enjoyed my sandwich. Can I really fault somebody for trying to make a buck? Maybe this is the only way you can run a restaurant these days. Franchise or die? I guess? But this doesn't seem to be the norm in places like New York and Chicago and other "food cities." Or is it? I don't know. I just know that I just moved to Northeast, and was excited to see what that area has been up to lately. And when 75% of the options around are places that I could have anywhere else in the city, what's the point? At which point does living in the city become no better or different than living in the suburbs? I can get Masu there too. And now Nye's is gone and there will be a new glass box there, probably with a new Hola Arepa location, or maybe a Sonora Grill, or really just probably a Potbelly, because what's the difference anymore.